California Is Coming for Trump's Tax Returns

California lawmakers on Saturday voted in favor of a so-called "sanctuary state" bill aimed at improving protections for immigrants.

It prohibits law enforcement officials from asking about a person's immigration status or participating in immigration enforcement efforts.

In arguing against the measure, Republicans in the Assembly invoked the 2015 shooting of Kate Steinle by an undocumented immigrant in San Francisco, arguing that sanctuary protections make communities less safe.

The bill passed the Assembly by a vote of 51-26, and then the Senate by 27-11.

California Democrats approved a "sanctuary state" bill Saturday that would limit how local and state police can interact with federal immigration agents.

The California Values Act would forbid state and local law enforcement agencies from providing information to or acting as the deputies for federal immigration authorities.

Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, introduced SB54 shortly after Trump's election to cut off most interactions between federal immigration agents and local police and sheriff's officers.

Multiple cities have sought to defy President Trump's immigration enforcement policies, which require that state and local communities allow federal immigration access to detention facilities and provide 48 hours notice before they release an illegal alien wanted by federal authorities.

In an emotional debate that brought lawmakers on both sides to tears, supporters said the law is needed now more than ever.

California police chiefs dropped their opposition but sheriffs, who run jails where the biggest impacts will be felt, remain opposed. These are tough issues, rife with political conflict, and the passage of so many housing bills this year shows a new commitment in the Capitol to taking on these complex challenges. The Trump administration is playing politics with public safety.

Assemblyman Chris Holden, who held the measure in his Utilities and Energy Committee, said he would consider it again when the legislature returns in January for the second half of their two-year session.

The organization put out a release earlier this week, saying that "California's front-line law enforcement officers do not now engage in, and have no intention of engaging in, immigration enforcement in the field".

  • Jack Mann