Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham condemns 'evil' terrorist act at Ariana Grande gig

Speaking this morning, Burnham, who was elected as mayor of Manchester on May 4, said "after our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most hard of dawns". Five fire engines were eventually dispatched, but by then all the most unsafe work had been done.

He said: "We are grieving today, but we are strong".

"I am taking these concerns seriously and, at the appropriate time, they will be subject to a full evaluation and briefing. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured and we will do whatever we can to support them". Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

"Lastly I want to thank the people of Manchester".

At least 22 people have been killed and a further 59 injured after an attacker struck an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena on Monday night.

He then described the incident as an evil act.

He praised the people of Manchester for opening their doors to those affected by the attack and doing what they can to help. "Terrorism can happen anywhere and Manchester is expressing the best response the north of England can offer, they have come together to defy those who wish them harm".

Prime Minister Theresa May is expected to chair an emergency meeting of the Cabinet Office Briefing Room (COBRA) on Tuesday morning (23 May).

Jim McMahon, Labour's parliamentary candidate for Oldham West and Royton, said: "My heart has sunk, news none of us wanted to hear".

"Today the whole country will grieve for the people who have lost their lives".

David Parker, the Convener of SBC, has sent two letters, one addressed to Andy Burnham, the Mayor of Greater Manchester, and another to Councillor Eddie Newman, the Lord Mayor of Manchester.

"I would like to pay tribute to the bravery and dedication of the emergency services".

  • Jack Mann